Digital Escape Rooms

Escape from COVID-19
Golden Girls Escape Room
Pete the Cat and the Birthday Party Mystery!
Space Explorer Training- Digital Escape Room!
The Minotaur’s Labyrinth Escape Room!
North Carolina Escape Room
Escape the Sphinx!
Mandalorian Escape Room!
Ancient Egypt Tomb Challenge!
Sherlock Holmes Digital Escape Room
Escape the Fairy Tale: Part 1!
Escape the Fairy Tale: Part 2!
Marvel’s Avengers: Escape from the Hydra Base!
Escape from Star Killer Base! (Star Wars)
Pikachu’s Rescue
Cinderella’s Escape!
Spy Apprentice Adventure!
Harry Potter Digital Escape from Hogwarts!
Alice in Wonderland Digital Escape Room!
Dog Man Digital Escape Room
Harry Potter Digital Escape from Hogwarts
Marvel’s Avengers: Escape From the Hydra Base
Escape From Wonderland Digital Escape Room
Sherlock Holmes Digital Escape Room (Thanks to Sherlock the Musical)
Escape the Fairy Tale: Part 1 (Thanks to East Orange Public Library)
Escape the Fairy Tale: Part 2 (Thanks to East Orange Public Library)
Escape from Star Killer Base; Star Wars (Thanks to Richmond Hill Public Library)
Pikachu’s Rescue (Thanks to the High River Library)
Cinderella’s Escape (Thanks Moultrie-Colquitt County Library System)
Spy Apprentice Adventure (Thanks Washington-Centerville Public Library)
Golden Girls Escape Room (Thanks to unknown)
Pete the Cat and the Birthday Party Mystery (Thanks Abington Free Library)
Space Explorer Training- Digital Escape Room (Thanks Campbell County Public Library)
The Minotaur’s Labyrinth Escape Room (Thanks Salt Lake County: Riverton Library)
North Carolina Escape Room (Thanks To Davie County Public Library)
Escape the Sphinx (Thanks Clermont County Library)
Mandalorian Escape Room (Thanks Manchester Community College Library)
Ancient Egypt Tomb Challenge (Thanks Campbell County Public Library)

Click here to make a copy of this FREE digital escape room planning template.

How to Turn any Worksheet into an Escape Room

How One Mom Used An Escape Kit To Throw A Party Her Kids Will Never Forget

How to Create a Digital Breakout for the Classroom

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-HgK4DPgwWIa6SCTlnS9Jo4SL8dbYPR_38uyFj6Mrpg/mobilebasic

 

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved

New

With all due respect to old, borrowed, and blue things, today’s prompt is all about the refreshingly, excitingly new.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iBlog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around New? We’re here to help:

  • Tell us about a new skill, hobby, or activity you’ve become interested in recently.
  • Who’s your newest friend? Share the story of how you connected.
  • Spring is here (in the Northern Hemisphere, anyway) — what do you most look forward to in this season of new beginnings?
  • Is your blog or website new (loosely defined)? Tell us why you decided to launch it.
  • Publish a post in a genre, format, or media that’s totally new to you. For example: poets, share a photo (or several); photographers, write some flash fiction; travel bloggers, post a book review. (And so on and so forth.)

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved

Three

Today’s prompt is all about trios, triptychs, and other things that come in three parts.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iBlog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Three? We’re here to help:

  • Write about the three objects, books, songs, people, or places that best tell the story of the past year in your life.
  • Share a photo that makes great use of the rule of thirds. (Or, as an alternative, go for an image that showcases three subjects, whether they’re human, inanimate, or something else.)
  • Haiku famously call for three verses. Write a few (maybe… three?) about something you saw on your last walk.
  • Publish a short story or a piece of memoir composed of three sections or vignettes.
  • Think about where you were — geographically, mentally, academically, or any other way — three years ago. What’s the biggest change you’ve gone through during that period?

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved

Distance

Whether your brain thinks in feet, meters, leagues, or lightyears, today let’s think about distance.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Distance? We’re here to help:

  • During this time of physical (and/or social) distancing, what’s the thing you miss the most about being in close proximity to others?
  • What’s the farthest you’ve ever traveled from your hometown, region, or country? Share one thing that you learned in that faraway (for you) place.
  • Distance doesn’t have to be spatial — it can be temporal as well. Write about a period in your life that now feels as if it took place in a different galaxy.
  • Share a photo that stretches far into the horizon, or go to your window and snap a photo that includes the farthest object or structure you can see.
  • Write a story, poem, or imagined dialogue featuring you and a person you were once very close to, but who is now a distant presence in your life.

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved

Slow

With half of April behind us, now is as good a time as any to slow things down.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Slow? We’re here to help:

  • Tell us about an activity, chore, or habit most people devote little time to, but that you enjoy lingering on.
  • What’s your favorite slow-cooked food, and what would be lost if you could prepare it in a few minutes?
  • What music, art, or literature do you turn to when you don’t need to rush?
  • Are you a photographer? Share a recent long-exposure shot. Or, if you’re like me and you only have your phone’s camera, take a photo of an object or landscape that channels slowness visually.
  • Write a poem about feeling calm, relaxed, bored, or unproductive.

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved

Scent

We’re going olfactory today: your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to publish a post around a scent.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Scent? We’re here to help:

  • Create a list ranking the top-ten scents that make you feel at home.
  • Write about a food or beverage whose smell immediately makes you hungry (or, conversely, makes you lose your appetite in an instant).
  • Take a photo of an object (from a bottle of perfume to a freshly mowed lawn) in a way that makes it so vivid, your viewers could practically smell it.
  • Write a short story or a series of vignettes revolving around a memory unlocked through a specific scent.
  • How would you rank the sense of smell among the other senses? Is it more or less powerful for you than, say, touch or taste?

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved

Philosophy Conundrums

Philosophy Conundrums

 1.

 There are people on the streets without shelter; the government owns many vacant houses no one wants to buy. Should the government let these people live in these houses?

 2.

There is a book in the library that I think is a neat book. The publisher owns the copyright but will not print any more copies of the book to sell. Do I have the moral right to photocopy the book then?

 3.

Suppose that the earth was perfectly smooth all the way around, with no hills or valleys or bumps of any sort, and suppose you tie a ribbon around the equator after pulling it tight so that it fits snugly to the surface all the way around. Now imagine splicing in an extra piece of ribbon –exactly one meter (that is, 100 centimetres) long– and then smoothing out the entire ribbon all the way around the globe, pulling out all the slack so that the ribbon is now everywhere the same height above the earth’s surface, if it comes above the earth’s surface at all. Will you notice a difference?

 4.

If one twin gets in a rocket ship and takes a 50-year space trip at very near the speed of light, when he returns to earth, will he be much younger or older than the twin who stayed here on earth?

 5.

In order to figure out a math problem, do you need to know whether you are doing it in Greek math, French math, God’s math, or Canadian math?

 6.

Are Man’s hockey rules different from God’s hockey rules?

 7.

Are Man’s and God’s mathematical laws and principles different?

 8.

If you drop a raw egg from the roof of the Fr. Cordeau Centre onto the lawn below, will it break?

 9.

If the current 100-meter sprint world champion, Donovan Bailey is healthy and ran a fair 100-yard race tomorrow against Mr. Sader, will the Thirty-something-year-old, slightly scrawny, Mr. Sader win by at least 3 seconds?

 10.

For children to grow up to be happy, you should not raise them in ways that (1) make them insensitive to other people’s sorrows and problems so that they do not feel bad just because someone else is suffering, and so that they don’t have to be concerned with other people any more than is simply polite, and (2) make sure they have only limited goals and aspirations because those will be much easier to be successful at and therefore bring happiness.

 11.

 If God and people both have to figure out what is mathematically or morally correct, people cannot figure out any of the same principles or answers God can without looking at God’s answer sheet.

 12.

 Suppose that your spouse or your baby, like in an old movie, is tied to a railroad track with a train approaching that is carrying 100 people. You are at the switch, but if you switch the train away from your spouse or baby, it will run over a broken bridge off a high cliff with jagged rocks and a raging current hundreds of feet below. What should you do? Why?

 13.

What is the modern definition of death?

 14.

Do I have the moral right to secretly hook up to the cable TV company, even though it is illegal?

 15.

Is it reasonable to forgive somebody who is not sorry for the wrong thing that he did?

 16.

If a person is irresponsible and does something that hurts someone else, should he be punished?

 17.

If a person is irresponsible and does something that hurts only himself, should he be punished?

 18.

You can never leave any room you are in, because before you can get to the door, you first have to go halfway to the door. But before you get halfway to the door you must first get halfway to that place (that is, one-fourth of the way to the door). But there are an infinite number of such halfway places and you do not have time to go to an infinite number of places, so you can never get out of any room — or move anywhere. Right?

 19.

A turtle and a rabbit are about to run a race, and the rabbit wants to be fair so he gives the turtle a good head start. The race begins and pretty soon the rabbit gets up to the place where the turtle has started from. But, of course, the turtle has moved ahead a bit to a new place, further down the course. So pretty soon the rabbit gets to that place, but again, by then the turtle has moved ahead to the next new place. When the rabbit gets there, the turtle will again have moved ahead. Therefore the rabbit can never beat the turtle because the rabbit can in fact never even catch up with the turtle, since every time he gets to where the turtle was just an instant ago, the turtle will have already left that place. Right?

 20.

If your spouse wants to go out for the evening with you, say to a particular movie, but you do not want to go, what should you do?

 21.

Describe exactly what it is for someone to have a headache.

 22.

What is a brave act?

 23.

In the middle of a large field there is an old oak tree with a thick trunk. A squirrel is on the trunk of the tree, about five feet from the ground. A man is on the other side of the tree about 10 feet from it. He knows the squirrel is there and he circles around the tree in order to see the squirrel. But the squirrel does not want to be seen, so it circles the trunk too (in the same direction), keeping the trunk between himself and the man. Both are going around the tree, but is the man going around the squirrel or not? Why or why not?

 24.

Can you tell who wrote or is playing a piece of music (or who wrote a work of literature) even if you never heard (or read) the piece before? Do writers and performers have particular characteristics or styles? If a writer or performer does have particular characteristics that are in most of his/her work, does that make her/him better or worse than someone who does not have a particular style? Or does it make no difference? Why?

 25.

What makes a film or TV program or series a good one?

 26.

Would it be theoretically possible to make a robot or computer that could think?

 27.

When, if ever, is it right to break a promise or a date or appointment?

 28.

What makes a work of art (painting, music, film, sculpture, literature, or whatever) a good one?

 29.

What is a good person?

 30.

Is it more important to be a good person (and/or do the right thing) or to have good things happen to you?

 31.

If the mind is the place that all your sensations are perceived, how can you tell they don’t simply start there?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved

Book

Let’s turn to the pleasures of reading: today, post something about a book.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Book? We’re here to help:

  • Has a book ever changed your life? Which one is it, and how did it transform you?
  • If you could lead the life of a character in any book you’ve read, who would it be?
  • Choose five important people in your life, and (virtually) dedicate a specific book to each one.
  • Spend a few minutes by your bookcase and create a book-spine poem — then snap a photo of it, and share it with your readers.
  • Have you written a book or thought about it? Tell us what your project is about.
  • Feeling less bookish today? No worries: use “book” as a verb and tell us about a restaurant, event, or trip you’d reserve a spot at as soon as it becomes possible again.

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved

Teach

We never stop learning — because there’s always someone who can teach us new, unexpected things.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Teach? We’re here to help:

  • We all possess niche, quirky talents. Write a post in which you teach your readers something — from baking a perfect chocolate-chip cookie to fixing a clogged shower drain.
  • Share links to some of the websites, magazines, or podcasts that never cease to inspire you to learn new things.
  • What subject or skill was the toughest for you to learn — and what did your teacher do to help you master it?
  • If you have a pet, what did you most enjoy teaching your pet?

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved

Light

Let’s set aside dark and heavy for a day, and focus on light instead.

Ready to roll? All you need to do is…

  • Write a new post on your iblog in response to the prompt.

Need more ideas? Not sure what to write around Light? We’re here to help:

  • Describe the last time you felt positively lighthearted and carefree.
  • Candles, desk lamps, screen glare, the sun: tell us about the light source that you find most conducive to writing.
  • Share a photo with a particularly dramatic arrangement of light and shade.
  • Focus on any of the other (many) meanings of “light,” from “non-serious” or even “frivolous,” to “weightless” or “a prominent person in a specific field.”
  • Poets, you know what to do: stars, feathers, a dusting of snow, or a roaring fireplace are the stuff ballads and haiku are made of.

©2020 Mr. D. Sader | snowflakes | All Rights Reserved